Pirate Party: Make a Pirate Name!

Pirate Party: Make a Pirate Name!

We have our pirate party coming up this Friday in celebration of International Talk Like a Pirate Day (Sept 19).  As I was planning our party I kept finding fun pirate name generators- but I never found one that was really kid friendly…So I made my own!  Feel free to use this in your own pirate adventures, just like Hafuboti already has! I wanted to share this early in case anyone else has pirate-y things planned this week!

 Click the image for a PDF version of the Pirate Name Generator or HERE for the google doc link :)

Pirate PNGYours truly, Miss Swashbuckler :)

 

Maker Morning: Engineering for kids

Maker Morning: Engineering for kids

Maker

Last week our theme for maker morning was Engineering and it was also my theme for our weekly Science Lab.  This post will be a combination of the two because the two programs were similar and I feel I would repeat myself if I separated the two.  Maker morning is a STEAM (Science Technology Engineering Arts and Math) based learning environment open for 2nd grade through 9th graders.  Each week has a theme and we try to have three or four activities that cater to that wide range of ages. This is collaborative program with the teen department and children’s department and I work on it with one of library director’s.  The Science lab is for pre-school through 6th grade.

Engineering for Kids!

I started the Science Lab program with Rosie Revere, Engineer and an explanation of what an engineer is.  I also made sure that each of the kid knows (and this was part of the book too) that it is okay to not get it right the first time and an engineer is constantly learning from his or her mistakes.

Rosie Revere Engineer

Cups

jose

This was a super simple idea: Cups!  We just had a bunch of Solo cups available and they could do what they want with them.  They had a lot of fun making super tall towers and structures. We had all ages (pre-school through my high school volunteers) interested in this activity.  This was also a good project that taught teamwork.

Balloon Powered Lego Car

Balloon Car

Balloon Car

Maker Morning

The rules were simple: create a Lego car that was powered by a balloon.  Eventually this one became part of the cup activity and we were trying to make cars powerful enough to knock over the huge cup tower. A lot of the parents got really into this activity and loved the challenge of knocking over the cups.

Construction Squares

Construction Squares

I have done this activity from Happy Hooligans and both times it was a success.  This was great to have for both programs because of big age ranges.  A lot of the younger kids enjoyed this activity and really got into the building. The prep work for this one does take same time as you need to cut out the construction squares and then cut the slots into them.

Edible Architecture

Edible Architecture

 Edible Architecture

Edible Architecture

This is no way a new idea and I have seen it on pinterest all over the place but it was still a hit (and cheap!). I think I first saw the pin from Deceptively Educational.  This station had a challenge: to get your tower 8 inches high!  We had two kids actually complete the assignment.

and my favorite… Magnetic Marble Run!

Magnetic Marble Run

Magnetic Marble Run

So I have done this idea before just on a piece of plywood and taping toilet paper rolls on, similar to this marble run by Lemon Lime Adventures. I wanted to take it a step further and make it more science-y be creating a magnetic board.  I started with a huge piece of plywood (I didn’t want the marble run to be too easy!) and painted it with Rust-Oleum Magnetic paint.  Here is where I went wrong: for the huge piece of board I have I should have used two cans of the paint.  Instead I was forced to stretch it thin and because of that it was very weak (hence the duct tape in the pictures).  I then spray painted over the black magnetic paint with a metallic paint so that it looked more magnetic.  The next part was an experiment in itself:  I needed to make the pool noodles magnetic.  First, I cut them in half and then in section to make the track part of the marble run.  I learned that the basic stick on magnets don’t work because a) they don’t stick on and b) definitely not strong enough.  I also bought these huge heavy magnets but they were way too heavy.  The ones that seemed to work (and glue on) the best were the Neodymium Magnets.  Since the board itself wasn’t strong enough we did end up having to duct tape on many of the tracks.

It still worked great and was a huge hit!  It definitely required team work because the board was so big and multiple kids wanted to work on it at once.

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All of these programs were very well received by both the kids and parents!

DIY Books!

DIY Books!

I wanted to make books for my youth writers group.  But, I wanted them to be nice books, and I did not want them to fall apart easily.  I also wanted them to be able to customize them.

With that being said, apparently everything was in my favor when I happened upon PVA glue at a garage sale.  This is the brand I got but I am sure there are other brands that work just as well… Although the price in that link isn’t too bad (not as good as $2 at a garage sale though!)

In the book assembly I took a stack of looseleaf paper and put it in between two pieces of construction paper, with all the edges lining up on one side.  I think took a skinny piece of construction paper to make the “spine”.  I put the glue on the spine paper and put it around the stacks of paper, along the edges that were lined up.  I then put the book under something heavy so they would dry nice and tight.

book

The books turned out great and the kids loved decorating them!  This also saves me on having to keep track of all their stories on looseleaf paper!

Youth Writers Group- Rock Stories

Youth Writers Group- Rock Stories

One of the programs I inherited when I came into my new position was a youth writer’s group.  This was a group of 5th & 6th grade girls who met once a week, shared their stories, and had open writing time.  I was excited about taking over this group because I used to love writing and I wanted to really help these girls expand on their writing skills– while still having fun!

First, I changed our meeting time to twice a month (ever other week).  I felt like the girls were relying on me too much to lead and I really wanted to give them independence.  So, for the “off” weeks, they are still meeting, just at a separate table near my desk.  They have only had one day like this so far and instead of writing their stories they wrote me letters, and I did have to ask them to quite down a few times, but I think overall it was a good experience and we will continue.

The off weeks are for sharing their stories, critiquing each others stories (nicely), and to free write. The weeks that I meet with them will have more writing exercises and learning new writing skills.

One of the first writing prompts I made for them was adapted from this Stories Stones idea.  Basically, I just went outside and found about 30ish large rocks and washed them.  I then wrote down one word or phrase on each rock.  I was mostly writing down random words but I did make sure I had a variety of people, places, things, ideas, and actions.

Rock Stories

I then had each girl pick one rock out of the pile and then they free wrote for a half an hour making up a story incorporating those words. After free write they shared their stories. I loved hearing how vastly different each kids story was even though they all started from the same place!

 

I will be writing more posts about my youth writers group in the future! :)